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Drug Information > Propoxyphene

Drug Appearance:

Tablets, capsules

Signs of Use:

Dizziness, drowsiness, headache, euphoria, sysphoria, asthenia

Dangers:

Skin rash and other allergic reactions occur occasionally and may be accompanied by drug fever and mucosal lesions, stupor or coma, convulsions, respiratory depression

Common forms of Propoxyphene:

Proprietary (Trade) Name Substance DEA Schedule*
Darvacet Dextropropoxyphene II

Further Information

Dextropropoxyphene is an analgesic in the opioid category. It is used to treat mild to moderate pain and as an anti-tussive. It can be used to ease surgical pain both prophylactically and palliatively. It is possible to classify it as a mild opioid pain-killer, however it is considered no more effective than aspirin in treating pain.[2]

Dextropropoxyphene is sometimes combined with paracetamol (acetaminophen) or aspirin. Trade-names include Darvocet-N for dextropropoxyphene and paracetamol and Darvon-N

In pure form, dextropropoxyphene is commonly used to ease the withdrawal symptoms in people addicted to opioids. Being very weak in comparison to the opioids that are commonly abused, dextropropoxyphene can only act as a "partial" substitute. It does not have much effect on mental cravings; however it can be effective in alleviating physical withdrawal effects, such as muscle cramps.

Dextropropoxyphene is subject to some controversy: while many physicians prescribe it for a wide range of mildly to moderately painful symptoms as well as for treatment of diarrhea, many others refuse to prescribe it, citing limited effectiveness.

Detection

Substance: Urine Hair Saliva
Propoxyphene 1-3 days N/A N/A

    *Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Schedule I and II drugs have a high potential for abuse. They require greater storage security and have a quota on manufacture among other restrictions. Schedule I drugs are available for research only and have no approved medical use. Schedule II drugs are available only through prescription, cannot have refills and require a form for ordering. Schedule III and IV drugs are available with prescription, may have 5 refills in 6 months and may be ordered orally. Most Schedule V drugs are available over the counter.