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"Our mission is to change the landscape of Substance Abuse testing,
by merging science and social responsibility."

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Frequently Asked Questions

Donor Frequently Asked Questions

Regarding the process:

Is the process controlled and confidential?
What information do they put on the forms that go with my sample?
May donors be required to strip, wear a hospital gown, or empty pockets?
What if I just can't "go" right then (shy bladder)? Can I just go home and come back later?
What if I am physically unable to provide a specimen?
What is GC/MS confirmation?
What are the turn-around times for the test results to come back?
How reliable is drug testing?

Regarding general drug testing questions:

What are the different types of methods used to drug test?
What kinds of tests would I have to take? What drugs would I be tested for?
What does testing "positive" mean? What does testing "negative" mean?
Who establishes the cutoff levels?
What is a MRO?
What qualifications is the MRO required to have?
What should I do if someone I work with has a drug problem?
Can I go to management for assistance if I have a drug or alcohol problem? What would happen?

Regarding donor rights:

Do employers have the right to require that employees be tested for drugs and alcohol?
Is drug testing an invasion of privacy?
What rights do I have in a testing program?
What happens if I decline to be tested?
Are my records truly confidential?
What are the applicable laws?
Is testing for additional drugs authorized? Must a separate specimen be obtained?
Is the collection of blood authorized? Can blood test results be used to take D.O.T.-required administrative actions?

Regarding positive tests:

Should I avoid taking foods or medicines before the test?
Can a donor test positive for secondhand smoke?
What is a "false" positive, and how can they occur?
What will be done to me if I test positive?
What can I do if I'm wrongfully accused?
What level of drug in the urine indicated that an individual is impaired?
What are the detection times for different drugs?

Employer Frequently Asked Questions

Costs and benefits of drug and alcohol testing programs:

What are the costs of not having a program?
What are the benefits of having a drug and alcohol testing program?

What services GlobalLab offers:

What types of consultation can GlobalLab provide?
What alcohol testing services can GlobalLab provide?
What drug testing services can GlobalLab provide?
Can I have someone come out to my company to do the testing?

Rights and laws associated with drug and alcohol testing:

Do employers have the right to require that employees be tested for drugs and alcohol?
Is drug testing an invasion of privacy?
What are the applicable laws?
Is testing for additional drugs authorized? Must a separate specimen be obtained?
Is the collection of blood authorized? Can blood test results be used to take D.O.T.-required administrative actions?

Questions about drug testing:

How reliable is drug testing?
What are the different types of methods used to drug test?
What drugs can you test for?
Who establishes the cutoff levels?
What are the turn-around times for the test results to come back?
What is GC/MS confirmation?
What does testing "positive" mean? What does testing "negative" mean?
Can a donor test positive for secondhand smoke?
What is a "false" positive, and how can they occur?
What level of drug in the urine indicated that an individual is impaired?
What are the detection times for different drugs?
What is a MRO?
What qualifications is the MRO required to have?

Parent Frequently Asked Questions

General Information:

How do I know if my child is abusing drugs or alcohol?
How reliable is drug testing?
Where can I go to find out more about different drugs?
Where can I go to find out more information on the Internet?

What can I find out by testing my child:

What drug testing services can GlobalLab provide?
What level of drug in the urine indicated that an individual is impaired?
What are the detection times for different drugs?
What drugs can my child be tested for?
What are the different types of methods used to drug test?
Should I instruct my child to avoid ingesting certain foods or medicines before the test?
Can my child test positive for secondhand smoke?
What is a "false" positive, and how can they occur?
What is GC/MS confirmation?
What are the turn-around times for the test results to come back?
What does testing "positive" mean?  What does testing "negative" mean?
What is a MRO?
What qualifications is the MRO required to have?

Drug testing process questions:

Is drug testing an invasion of privacy?
Is the process controlled and confidential?
What information do they put on the forms that go with my sample?
May donors be required to strip, wear a hospital gown, or empty pockets?
What if my child just can't "go" right then (shy bladder)?  Can I just him/her back home and come back later?
What if my child is physically unable to provide a specimen?

Is the process controlled and confidential?

Yes. Specimens are collected at the collection site and processed through a National Institute of Drug Abuse (N.I.D.A.) approved laboratory. To guard against tampering, a legal chain-of-custody procedure is followed. To assure donors confidentiality, specimen containers are carefully identified by an assigned coding systems, referred to as the chain-of-custody number. The results are then reported using the same coding system. A medical review officer (MRO) reviews all D.O.T. specimens as well as any positive results.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


What information do they put on the forms that go with my sample?

D.O.T. testing requires a special form that is designed to provide anonymity for the donor and will not have your name on it (for the laboratory copy). For all other testing, a similar form is used, but typically has the donor name on the laboratory copy. While the collector does typically as for your social security number, you are not required by law to give it, for either D.O.T. or any other testing. The purpose of putting your social security number on the test is to give you a number that you can confirm in case any questions arise, especially if you have prescriptions, as the MRO must verify your identity before discussing results. If you are uncomfortable giving your social security number, I.D. numbers from federal or state issued forms of identification are another viable option for you to use (i.e. your driver's license or I.D. card number).

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


May donors be required to strip, wear a hospital gown, or empty pockets?

You do not have to strip or wear a gown. The D.O.T.'s procedures state: "The collection site person shall ask the individual to remove any unnecessary outer garments such as a coat or jacket that might conceal items or substances that could be used to tamper with or adulterate the individual's specimen. The collection site person shall insure that all personal belongings such as a purse or briefcase remain with the outer garments. The individual may retain his or her wallet." (D.O.T. 49 CFR Part 40)

It should be noted that a collection site person may ask the donor to empty their pockets, display the items, and either leave their belongings with the collector, again, the individual may retain his or her wallet. This does not mean an individual may keep a purse or other sort of bag with them during the collection. The collection site person will provide a secure area for individuals to place their personal belongings.

It should also be noted that it is permissible to have an observed collection if the employer requests, with a sound reason, or if there is a suspicion of tampering.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


What if I just can't "go" right then (shy bladder)? Can I just go home and come back later?

If the donor is unable to provide a specimen initially, fluids are provided, with the dual objective of assisting the willing donor and encouraging the non-willing donor. There is no option for the donor to leave teh site and ocme back at a later time. Only if the donor is still unable to provide a complete specimen do additional procedures come into play (D.O.T. 49 CFR Part 40).

The donor is not required to drink the fluids provided. According to D.O.T. guidelines (D.O.T. 49 CFR Part 40), the donor is allowed 3 hours from the time the first specimen is provided to provide a complete specimen. If the donor is unable to provide another specimen in the time allotted, there is a procedure to verify a medical condition. If the donor is unwilling to provide a specimen, then it is considered a refusal to test which is treated the same as a positive.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


What if I am physically unable to provide a specimen?

Specific documentation of the individual's medical condition, including the fact that he or she is unable to provide a urine specimen, should be obtained and furnished to the employer. The MRO should, after a thorough examination of the individual's circumstance, notify the employer that the individual cannot provide a urine specimen (D.O.T. 49 CFR Part 40).

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


What is GC/MS confirmation?

Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) is an extremely accurate procedure that identifies each chemical compound on the basis of its unique molecular structure and can determine a quantitative level of any positive drugs in the specimen provided for testing.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


What are the turn-around times for the test results to come back?

Typically, results come back in 24 to 48 hours from the time the lab receives the specimen. Tests that are deemed positive from the laboratory, whether caused by prescription or not, tend to take a longer amount of time to come back, up to 72 to 96 hours from the time the lab receives the specimen, due to the need for further testing at the laboratory and time for the MRO to contact the donor and discuss the results. Around nationally recognized holidays and during some weather emergencies (depending on where the laboratory is located), results may take a longer than normal time, but this delay usually does not exceed 24 to 48 hours past the normal reporting time.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


How reliable is drug testing?

When both screening and confirmatory tests are conducted, the combined tests themselves become virtually 100% dependable. Most testing is automatically set up to do both the screening and confirmatory types of tests.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


What are the different types of methods used to drug test?

Urine, saliva, and hair are three of the most commonly used methods to detect drug use. Each method has advantages and disadvantages.

Urine is generally considered the standard because this has been used as the method of drug testing for several years. Saliva is developing quite rapidly as an alternative to testing due to its less intrusive nature. Hair testing offers the option of viewing a longer detection time for drugs.

Please see Detection Times for a list of what substances can be tested in the different methods and the average amount of time after use that the substance can be detected.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


What kinds of tests would I have to take? What drugs would I be tested for?

Your employer has the right to set up a testing program for illicit drugs and/or alcohol and drug abuse. Under most circumstances, the types of tests, the drugs tested for, and the cut-off levels can all be determined by your employer except in cases of D.O.T.-mandated testing. However, the manner in which the testing is required may be (and in many cases, is) regulated by both Federal and State governments. Most companies use the same cut-off levels that the government sets (required for all testing falling under D.O.T. jurisdiction), however, some companies due use L.O.D. L.O.D. is the lowest level of detection that the laboratory is able to test. As technology improves, laboratories are able to test at lower and lower levels. Many of the drugs being tested are now able to be tested at near zero levels.

Our standard urine specimen five-drug panel and nine panel screens for the presence of the following drugs and drug classes:

Five -Panel:

Drug Group EIA Screen Cutoff* (ng/mL**) GC/MS Cutoff*(ng/mL**)
Amphetamines 1,000 500
Cocaine 300 150
Marijuana 50 15
Opiates 2,000 2,000
Phencyclidine (PCP) 25 25

    * These are standard cutoff levels; alternate cutoff levels may be available.
    ** Nanograms per milliliter; the above cutoff levels, list of analytes and test methodologies are subject to change when required by applicable government regulations or guidelines.

Nine-Panel

Drug Group EIA Screen Cutoff* (ng/mL**) GC/MS Cutoff*(ng/mL**)
Amphetamines 1,000 500
Cocaine 300 150
Marijuana 50 15
Opiates 2,000 2,000
Phencyclidine (PCP) 25 25
Barbiturates 300 300
Barbiturates 300 200
Benzodiazepines 300 200
Methadone 300 200
Propoxyphene 300 200

    * These are standard cutoff levels; alternate cutoff levels may be available.
    ** Nanograms per milliliter; the above cutoff levels, list of analytes and test methodologies are subject to change when required by applicable government regulations or guidelines.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


What does testing "positive" mean? What does testing "negative" mean?

Testing laboratories use "cutoff limits" to determine if a specimen is positive or negative. D.O.T. and the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) have established cutoff limit guidelines for both alcohol and drug testing. A negative result indicates the level of a drug or alcohol being tested for is either not present or is below the cutoff limit. A positive result indicates the substance is present at a level above the cutoff limit. It is important to note that all test results go through a MRO. The MRO reviews the test results, and in the case of a "positive" test, notifies the donor and discusses possible prescription interactions. If there is a valid prescription causing the "positive," the MRO will change the result to a verified negative and the company will receive a "negative" drug test result.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


Who establishes the cut off levels?

If you are under the jurisdiction of D.O.T., the you must follow the D.O.T. regulations and cut off levels. If not, then it is up to the employer.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


What is a MRO?

A MRO, Medical Review Officer, is a doctor who reviews drug test results to determine possible prescription interactions, conducts an interview with the donor (typically via the telephone) to discuss positive results, and discusses any questions regarding the testing process with a laboratory toxicologist.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


What qualifications is the MRO required to have?

The MRO shall be a licensed physician with knowledge of substance abuse disorders. GlobalLab's MROs are certified through the American Association of Medical Review Officers, complete courses and seminars related to drug testing to remain current with all information in the testing process, and meet all requirements for D.O.T. compliance.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


What should I do if someone I work with has a drug problem?

That's a question you have to answer for yourself. But you owe it to yourself, the people who work with you, and the person with the problem to seriously consider discussing it with your supervisor, safety manager, or other managerial person. Whether or not you discuss it with the person who has the problem depends to a great extent on your relationship with that person. Most of the time it's not advisable. A person with a serious problem, whether it's drugs or alcohol, usually needs professional help.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


Can I go to management for assistance if I have a drug or alcohol problem? What would happen?

That depends on your company and its Policies and Procedures. Ask the person in charge of yourtesting program.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


Do employers have the right to require that employees be tested for drugs and alcohol?

Yes for both drugs and alcohol, but it has to be done fairly.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


Is drug testing an invasion of privacy?

If the program is properly administered and within Federal and State law and guidelines, the courts have determined that drug testing is not an invasion of privacy. The primary factor (among others) with respect to court decisions is the welfare and safety of others.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


What rights do I have in a testing program?

Your basic rights extend primarily to the right to privacy and the right to question the legitimacy of a test result. You may have additional rights depending on your individual circumstances as well as State and local regulations.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


What happens if I decline to be tested?

Most company drug testing "Policies and Procedures" call for some form of disciplinary action up to and including dismissal. D.O.T. guidelines consider a refusal to test the same as a positive test (D.O.T. 49 CFR Part 40).

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


Are my records truly confidential?

Your employer and your MRO are required by law to keep test result records confidential, in a safe, restricted place. Testing records cannot be released to others without your consent. Exceptions to these requirements are limited to:

  1. D.O.T. agencies when license or certificate actions are required.
  2. The decision-maker in arbitration, litigation, or administrative proceedings when an employee initiates a grievance, lawsuit, or other action relating to test results. This includes unemployment and worker's compensation

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


What are the applicable laws?

Federally regulated employees must adhere to guidelines established by the Department of Transportation (D.O.T.).

Company policy largely determines the guidelines for non-D.O.T. testing. Laws in some states restrict the use of instant testing devices.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


Is testing for additional drugs authorized? Must a separate specimen be obtained?

If a company does not have employees that fall under D.O.T. jurisdiction, it is up to the company what drugs are to be tested. If a company has employees that fall under D.O.T. jurisdiction and want to establish a program that tests beyond the five drugs currently required must make a clear distinction to their employees what testing is required by D.O.T. authority and what testing is required by the company. Additionally, employers must insure that a separate specimen collection process including a separate act of urination is used to obtain specimens for company testing programs (D.O.T. 49 CFR Part 40).

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


Is the collection of blood authorized? Can blood test results be used to take D.O.T.-required administrative actions?

D.O.T. does not authorize the collection of blood for drug testing, except Post-Accidents for those who fall under the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). Therefore, while a company under its own authority may require a blood specimen to be collected and tested for drugs and/or alcohol under certain circumstances, it is not acceptable for the company-required blood specimen to be supported by the same custody and control form that accompanies a D.O.T.-required urine specimen (D.O.T. 49 CFR Part 40).

If a urine specimen for a D.O.T. reasonable cause test is rejected for testing at the laboratory, results from a blood test collected in accordance with a company policy could be used to take action against an employee depending upon the drug testing policy established by that company. Under no circumstances, however, can the result of the blood test be used to take administrative or disciplinary action against an employee using D.O.T. authority for the reasons cited above.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


Should I avoid taking foods or medicines before the test?

If you are taking prescribed medications for a specific condition, you should continue taking it. You will be given the opportunity to advise the MRO of this fact. As for food and drink, there's no reason not to eat and drink as usual.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


Can a donor test positive for secondhand smoke?

No. Research experiments have been conducted that expose nonsmoking individuals to heavy concentrations of marijuana smoke in confined quarters. The nonsmoking individuals could not absorb enough smoke, even after several hours of exposure, to cause a positive result in subsequent urinalysis.

What about with hair testing?

No. Even for hair testing, secondhand smoke will not cause a positive for two reasons. The first reason is because the lab sends the hair sample through a cleaning process that eliminates environmental contamination. The second reason is because even if someone does have the "parent" drug in their hair follicles, the laboratory will not deem the result positive if there is no metabolite of the drug present (meaning there has to be evidence that the drug was ingested).

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


What is a "false" positive, and how can they occur?

This is probably the most confusing issue regarding drug testing. Simply put, the tests are very accurate. If during screening, they detect a drug, it is sent for confirmation through GC/MS. If the drug detected is caused by a prescription the donor is taking from doctor's orders, it is a negated positive and reported as a verified negative. Some over-the-counter medications will screen positive, but the confirmation tests will rule out any illicit substances. What is generally called a "false" positive is simply a result which has not yet been confirmed.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


What will be done to me if I test positive?

Study your company's Policies and Procedures carefully as it should state in there the consequences of testing positive, which can include termination.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


What can I do if I'm wrongfully accused?

In the case of D.O.T. tests you can request, in writing, a re-test, as explained to you by the MRO during your interview. You will not be permitted to provide a new specimen. The secondary specimen taken at the time of donation will be opened and tested to confirm or refute the first positive report. You will normally have to pay for this retest. Please note that you only have 72 hours from the time you are notified of the result to request a retest.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


What level of drug in the urine indicated that an individual is impaired?

Physical impairment according to a given level is not the issue. The issue is whether or not illegal drugs are being used at all, and whether or not drug and alcohol abuse is taking place. Also, due to varying individual metabolic rates, the amount of drug ingested, and the concentration or strength of the drug ingested, there is no scientific correlation to allow one to determine by the level if an individual is impaired.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


What are the detection times for different drugs?

Substance:

Testing Method Used:

Drug Name: Urine Hair Oral Fluid
Amphetamines 1-3 days Up to 90 days 24-36 hours
Cocaine 1-3 days Up to 90 days 24-36 hours
Marijuana Occasional Use: 1-3 days
Chronic Use: up to 30 days
Up to 90 days Less than 24 hours
Opiates 1-3days Up to 90 days 24-36 hours
Phencyclidine (PCP) Occasional Use: 1-5 days
Chronic Use: up to 30 days
Up to 90 days 24-36 hours
Barbiturates 1-3 days
Phenobarbital 1-3 weeks
N/A N/A
Benzodiazepines 1-14 days N/A N/A
Methadone 1-3 days N/A N/A
Propoxyphene 1-7 days N/A N/A
MDMA (Ecstasy) 2-4 days Up to 90 days 24-36 hours
GHB Up to 72 hours N/A N/A
Rohypnol 1-3 days N/A N/A
Ketamine 1-2 days N/A N/A
LSD 8 hours N/A N/A
Steroids Taken orally:  up to 3 weeks
Injected: 3 months-1 year
N/A N/A
 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


What are the costs of not having a program?

While many employers feel that drug and alcohol testing programs are a waste of money, typically the money spent on a testing program is significantly less than what they would spend or lose from employees who abuse drugs or alcohol. There are a variety of testing options available and a sales associate would be more than happy to discuss pricing options, please contact us for more information. Below are some statistics of the costs associated with not having a testing program.

  • Increased employee absenteeism-66 percent higher absenteeism among drug users.
  • Abusers are 2.5 times more likely to use 8 or more days of employee sick time.
  • Abusers are 3 times more likely to be late for work.
  • Abusers are 2.2 times more likely to require early dismissal.
  • Costs in accidents and damages-5 times more likely to file a workers' compensation claim. Abusers are 3.6 times more likely to be involved in accidents.
  • Losses due to employee theft/fraud-Disciplinary actions are 90 percent higher among drug users.
  • Increased costs for health care-Health benefit utilization is 84 percent greater in dollar terms. Abusers are 3 times more likely to abuse the normal level of sick benefits.
  • It is estimated that employee drug use costs employers over $100 billion each year.
  • 71 percent of illegal drug users are employed - most working for small businesses, as estimated by the Federal government.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


What are the benefits of having a drug and alcohol testing program?

  • To protect the public, employees, and corporate safety
  • Fewer accidents
  • Reduced costs of insurance claims
  • Reduced Workman's Compensation claims
  • Reduced usage of medical benefits
  • Fewer disciplinary actions
  • Reduced losses due to absenteeism, theft, and fraud
  • Lower costs due to losses and errors
  • Decreased legal costs and costs of hiring and training new employees
  • Earlier identification and resolution of problems affecting job performance
  • To comply with government regulations

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


What types of consultation can GlobalLab provide?

GlobalLab can help your company with policy development, implementation, and management of sound substance abuse policies, procedures, and documentation that complies with Federal and State regulations and laws.

GlobalLab can also assist your company with training programs for collectors, instructors, and supervisors on topics including urine collections, instant testing product procedures, and drug and alcohol related workplace problems.

Please see Training for more information on available programs.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


What alcohol testing services can GlobalLab provide?

GlobalLab is equipped to administer either saliva or breath alcohol testing. Both are D.O.T. approved and a confirmation test is automatically done on positive screening tests.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


What drug testing services can GlobalLab provide?

GlobalLab has a variety of options available for your drug testing needs and we are more than happy to customize our service for your individual needs. Please see our Services listing for more information on specific testing types.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


Can I have someone come out to my company to do the testing?

GlobalLab is more than happy to help save your company time and money by coming to your site to administer the collections. Please contact us to discuss this in more detail and to schedule a time for us to come out.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


How do I know if my child is abusing drugs or alcohol?

Below is a list of common symptoms for a variety of drugs. It is important to note that many drugs have the same symptoms and that this is not an all-inclusive list of symptoms. Any noticeable change in behavior can be a sign of potential drug abuse.

Symptoms Potential Drugs
Aggressiveness Alcohol, Anabolic Steroids
Anxiety/Nervousness Amphetamines, Cocaine, PCP
Changes in physical appearances, increased masculinization Anabolic Steroids
Depression Alcohol, Barbiturates, LSD
Dilated pupils THC
Euphoria Cocaine, Opiates, Methadone, Propoxyphene, MDMA/Ecstasy
Flashbacks LSD
Increased appetite THC
Insensitivity to pain Opiates, PCP, Ketamine
Irritability Amphetamines, Cocaine
Lack of coordination THC, Alcohol, Barbiturates, Benzodiazepines, Methaqualone
Laughter THC, Alcohol
Long periods without rest or sleep Amphetamines, Cocaine
Loss of appetite Amphetamines, Cocaine
Mood-altering effects THC, PCP, Ketamine, LSD
Paranoia Cocaine, THC, PCP
Rapid speech, tremors Amphetamines, Cocaine, PCP
Relaxing or sedation of the body/drowsiness Opiates, Barbiturates, Benzodiazepines, Methadone, Methaqualone, Propoxyphene, GHB, Rohypnol, Ketamine
Tightness of muscles Amphetamines, Cocaine
 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


Where can I go to find out more about different drugs?

Click on any of the drug links below for detailed information about each substance, including: symptoms of use/abuse, detection capabilities, etc.

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


Where else can I go to find out more information on the Internet?

Drug Facts - Office of National Drug Control Policy
NIDA - National Institute on Drug Abuse
NDIC - National Drug Intelligence Center
The Anti-Drug - Information center for Parents
Drug-Free America - Another information resource for Parents

 

Donor Faq's    Employer Faq's    Parent Faq's      


Should I avoid ingesting certain foods or medicines before the test?

If you are taking prescribed medications for a specific condition, you should continue taking it. You will be given the opportunity to advise the MRO of this fact. As for food and drink, there's no reason not to eat and drink as usual.

gLab test results